NASA announces new target launch date


NASA announced Wednesday that they will roll the Artemis I SLS moon rocket back out to the pad for another launch attempt next month.First, it was a rocket engine sensor, then a hydrogen leak and then came Hurricane Ian. But now NASA is moving forward for the next launch attempt on Nov. 14 just after midnight.The SLS stack was rolled back into the Vehicle Assembly Building before Ian slammed the Cape and that gave launch teams time to cover their bases.“It’s going to be about another month before we really do the launch. So very important to charge up the batteries and make sure everything is ready to go beyond the leak issues they’ve had,” said Don Platt of Florida Tech.The rocket has been stacked for over a year and had been on pad 39B for about seven weeks.As this is the first time the SLS rocket stack will fly, there won’t be astronauts on board. But there will be mannequins with sensors to detect the impact of the forces and environment.NASA engineers are confident that the issues that kept the SLS stack on the ground are fixed and that minimal work is needed to get it flight-ready.But unlike previous launch attempts, this next one will be at night which is not ideal as NASA wants to view every angle of this first-time SLS launch.“They probably did a risk-benefit analysis and decided that launching at night–and doing it now, in November–was more important than the loss of any camera data they might have,” Platt said.NASA officials said that the 322-foot rocket will roll back out no earlier than Nov. 4. “I think it’ll be interesting if they invite the vice president down this time. That’ll give us some indication of their confidence heading into this next attempt,” Eric Berger of Ars Technica said.If the SLS performs and the countdown goes as planned on Nov. 14, the mission will last 25 days. This is shorter than the 40-plus day mission if it launched in earlier attempts.And if the SLS rocket does not launch on Nov. 14, there are two backup dates on Nov. 16 and 19.

NASA announced Wednesday that they will roll the Artemis I SLS moon rocket back out to the pad for another launch attempt next month.

First, it was a rocket engine sensor, then a hydrogen leak and then came Hurricane Ian. But now NASA is moving forward for the next launch attempt on Nov. 14 just after midnight.

The SLS stack was rolled back into the Vehicle Assembly Building before Ian slammed the Cape and that gave launch teams time to cover their bases.

“It’s going to be about another month before we really do the launch. So very important to charge up the batteries and make sure everything is ready to go beyond the leak issues they’ve had,” said Don Platt of Florida Tech.

The rocket has been stacked for over a year and had been on pad 39B for about seven weeks.

As this is the first time the SLS rocket stack will fly, there won’t be astronauts on board. But there will be mannequins with sensors to detect the impact of the forces and environment.

NASA engineers are confident that the issues that kept the SLS stack on the ground are fixed and that minimal work is needed to get it flight-ready.

But unlike previous launch attempts, this next one will be at night which is not ideal as NASA wants to view every angle of this first-time SLS launch.

“They probably did a risk-benefit analysis and decided that launching at night–and doing it now, in November–was more important than the loss of any camera data they might have,” Platt said.

NASA officials said that the 322-foot rocket will roll back out no earlier than Nov. 4.

“I think it’ll be interesting if they invite the vice president down this time. That’ll give us some indication of their confidence heading into this next attempt,” Eric Berger of Ars Technica said.

If the SLS performs and the countdown goes as planned on Nov. 14, the mission will last 25 days. This is shorter than the 40-plus day mission if it launched in earlier attempts.

And if the SLS rocket does not launch on Nov. 14, there are two backup dates on Nov. 16 and 19.



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *