Russia-Ukraine war: Russia shelling pre-agreed UN route to Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant, says mayor – live | Ukraine


Key events

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) head Rafael Grossi has said that the agency would consider establishing a continued presence at Ukraine’s Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant.

“There has been increased military activity including this morning, until very recently, a few minutes ago … but weighing the pros and cons and having come so far, we are not stopping,” Reuters report he told journalists before setting out for the nuclear power plant.

Russia’s ministry of defence has issued a statement in which it describes what it says is the latest situation around the Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant (ZNPP) this morning.

Without presenting any evidence, the statement reads:

Today, at about 6am Moscow time, Ukrainian troops landed on the coast of the Kakhovka Reservoir, 3 km northeast of the ZNPP plant in two sabotage groups of up to 60 people in seven boats and attempted to seize the power plant. Measures have been taken to destroy the enemy, including with the use of army aviation.

In addition, from 8am Moscow time, the armed forces of Ukraine have been shelling the meeting point of the IAEA mission in the area of ​​​​the settlement of Vasylivka and the ZNPP. Four shells exploded at a distance of 400m from the first power unit.

The provocation of the Kyiv regime is aimed at disrupting the arrival of the IAEA working group at the ZNPP.

The claims have not been independently verified.

Ukraine has continued offensive operations in southern Ukraine, supported by intensive long-range strikes against Russian command and logistics locations across the occupied zone over 30-31 August, the UK Ministry of Defence has said.

The latest British intelligence report reads:

Ukraine’s Ministry of Defence also released video footage of Ukrainian aircraft operating high speed anti-radiation missiles (HARMs). Russian has previously claimed that it has recovered fragments of these types of weapons, which are designed to locate and destroy radars.

Russia prioritises strong ground-based air defences – the radar coverage which enables this is a critical capability in its Ukraine operation.

A substantial, sustained degradation of Russia’s radars with HARMs would be a major set-back to Russia’s already troubled situational awareness.”

Summary so far

It is approaching 9am in Ukraine. Here is where things stand:

  • The Russian-held city of Energodar, home to Europe’s largest nuclear power plant, has come under attack early this morning, Ukrainian officials have said. “Since five o’clock in the morning, constant mortar attacks on the city have not stopped,” the Ukrainian operator of the Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant, Energoatom, said in an update on its official Telegram channel.

  • Energodar city mayor, Dmytro Orlov, said “several civilian objects were hit” and confirmed there were victims from the attack in a separate post to his Telegram channel. Orlov published a series of images purportedly showing damage to apartment buildings, homes and shops. Thick black smoke can be seen rising in front of one large apartment block while shopfront windows appear shattered. Another photo shows two helicopters in the sky.

  • Today’s UN nuclear watchdog mission to inspect the Zaporizhzhia plant may be in jeopardy as Russia shells the pre-agreed route to the site, Ukrainian officials say.

  • Russian forces are shelling the pre-agreed route to the Zaporizhzhia plant, the regional state administrative head of the Zaporizhzhia region has said. Just before 8.30am on Thursday, Oleksandr Starukh posted an update to his Telegram channel, saying: “The Russians are shelling the pre-agreed route of the IAEA mission from Zaporizhzhia to the ZNPP. The UN advance team cannot continue the movement due to security reasons.”

  • Ukraine’s counteroffensive to reclaim Kherson has not stalled or failed, a senior adviser to Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, has said. “The fact that we have not taken Kherson yet does not mean that the operation in the south has stalled or failed,” Oleksiy Arestovych said in a video messaged posted to Telegram early on Thursday morning. “It is carried out in a planned manner. We destroy enemy logistics, air defence systems, fuel and ammunition depots.” Arestovych cautioned Ukrainians to be patient, adding “there will be no quick wins”.

  • Ukraine’s armed forces struck strategic bridges in the southern Kherson region to isolate Russian troops located on the right bank of the Dnieper, Arestovych added. Ukraine’s defence ministry said the Kakhovsky and Daryiv bridges, used by Russia to transport equipment and ammunition to the region, were “disabled” in an update posted to Telegram early on Thursday.

  • The Russian military has “severe manpower shortages” and is seeking to recruit contract service members and may even draw in convicted criminals, a US official has said, citing US intelligence. The official said this may include “compelling wounded soldiers to re-enter combat, acquiring personnel from private security companies, and paying bonuses to conscripts”.

  • Russia has stopped the flow of gas via the Nord Stream 1 pipeline to Europe, citing the need to carry out repairs. The German government rejects the claim, calling it a “pretence”. It said Nord Stream was “fully operational” and that there were no technical issues. The halt on the Baltic Sea pipeline at 5am on Wednesday would last for three days, said Gazprom, the Russian state energy company.

  • The EU has agreed to suspend a visa travel deal with Moscow. The bloc aims to curb the number of Russian nationals entering for holidays and shopping, but is stopping short of a full tourist visa ban. Meeting in Prague, the EU’s 27 foreign ministers promised to suspend the 2007 visa facilitation agreement with Russia that makes it relatively easy to obtain travel documents.

Russia shelling pre-agreed route to Zaporizhzhia plant, mayor says

Today’s UN nuclear watchdog mission to inspect the Zaporizhzhia plant may be in jeopardy as Russia shells the pre-agreed route to the site, Ukrainian officials say.

Earlier this morning we reported that the Russian-held city of Energodar, home to Europe’s largest nuclear power plant, came under attack, according to Ukrainian officials in the region.

The regional state administrative head of the Zaporizhzhia region is now saying Russian forces are shelling the pre-agreed route officials from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) would be taking to access the nuclear plant.

Just before 8.30am on Thursday, Oleksandr Starukh posted an update to his Telegram channel, saying:

The Russians are shelling the pre-agreed route of the IAEA mission from Zaporizhzhia to the ZNPP. The UN advance team cannot continue the movement due to security reasons.

Ukraine continues to make efforts to organise safe access of the international IAEA mission to the ZNPP. We demand that the Russian Federation stop the provocations and grant the IAEA unhindered access to the Ukrainian nuclear facility.”

Energodar city mayor, Dmytro Orlov, has released some more information regarding the shelling on the city next to the nuclear plant this morning.

Orlov published a series of images purportedly showing damage to apartment buildings, homes and shops. Thick black smoke can be seen rising in front of one large apartment block while shopfront windows appear shattered.

Another photo shows two helicopters in the sky. Orlov writes:

The very murderers of the civilian population, who are shelling Energodar in the morning with mortars, machine guns and shelling, have used aviation (helicopters are circling over the city) have already reported the dead and wounded as a result of their shelling‼️

The mayor added that he has received information that there may be civilian casualties and residential buildings have been hit.

City home to Zaporizhzhia plant under fire – reports

The Russian-held city of Energodar, home to Europe’s largest nuclear power plant, has come under attack early this morning, Ukrainian officials say.

The Ukrainian operator of the Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant, Energoatom, posted an update to its official Telegram channel just before 8am local time.

Since five o’clock in the morning, constant mortar attacks on the city have not stopped.”

Energodar city mayor, Dmytro Orlov, said “several civilian objects were hit” and confirmed there were victims from the attack in a separate post to his Telegram channel.

No ‘quick wins’ in Kherson, Zelenskiy adviser says

Ukraine’s counteroffensive to reclaim Kherson has not stalled or failed, a senior adviser to Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, has said.

Oleksiy Arestovych reiterated the offensive was still very much underway in a video messaged posted to Telegram early on Thursday morning.

The fact that we have not taken Kherson yet does not mean that the operation in the south has stalled or failed. It is carried out in a planned manner. We destroy enemy logistics, air defence systems, fuel and ammunition depots.

… There will be no quick wins. Initially, a strategy was taken to systematically grind Putin’s army.

It is long, so there is a lot of work to be done.

Black smoke rises at the front line in Ukraine’s southern Mykolaiv region on 30 August.
Black smoke rises at the front line in Ukraine’s southern Mykolaiv region on 30 August. Photograph: Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images

Ukraine’s armed forces struck strategic bridges in the southern Kherson region to isolate Russian troops located on the right bank of the Dnieper, Arestovych added.

Ukraine’s defence ministry said the Kakhovsky and Daryiv bridges, used by Russia to transport equipment and ammunition to the region, were “disabled” in an update posted to Telegram early on Thursday.

Nuclear inspectors due at Zaporizhzhia plant

Inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are due to inspect the Russian-held Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant today after arriving in Ukrainian-controlled Zaporizhzhia city on Wednesday.

The technical mission aims to prevent a nuclear accident.

However, uncertainty hangs over the planned inspectors’ visit.

IAEA chief, Rafael Grossi, told reporters from Zaporizhzhia city on Wednesday:

If we are able to establish a permanent presence, or a continued presence, then it’s going to be prolonged. But this first segment is going to take a few days.”

On Wednesday the Russian-occupying authorities said the team would be given access for one day.

Members of the IAEA mission depart Kyiv to visit the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in southern Ukraine.
Members of the IAEA mission depart Kyiv to visit the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in southern Ukraine. Photograph: Gleb Garanich/Reuters

Summary and welcome

Hello and welcome back to the Guardian’s live coverage of the war in Ukraine.

I’m Samantha Lock and I will be bringing you all the latest developments for the next short while. Whether you’ve been following our coverage overnight or you’ve just dropped in, here are the latest lines.

Inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are due to inspect the Russian-held Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant today after arriving in Ukrainian-controlled Zaporizhzhia city on Wednesday. The technical mission aims to prevent a nuclear accident.

Meanwhile, a senior Ukrainian presidential adviser has said Ukraine’s counteroffensive to reclaim the souther region of Kherson has not stalled or failed.

It is 7.30am in Kyiv. Here is where things stand:

  • Ukraine’s counteroffensive to reclaim Kherson has not stalled or failed, a senior adviser to Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, has said. “The fact that we have not taken Kherson yet does not mean that the operation in the south has stalled or failed,” Oleksiy Arestovych said in a video messaged posted to Telegram early on Thursday morning. “It is carried out in a planned manner. We destroy enemy logistics, air defence systems, fuel and ammunition depots.” Arestovych cautioned Ukrainians to be patient, adding “there will be no quick wins”.

  • Ukraine’s armed forces struck strategic bridges in the southern Kherson region to isolate Russian troops located on the right bank of the Dnieper, Arestovych added. Ukraine’s defence ministry said the Kakhovsky and Daryiv bridges, used by Russia to transport equipment and ammunition to the region, were “disabled” in an update posted to Telegram early on Thursday.

  • Uncertainty hangs over the planned inspectors’ visit to the Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant. “If we are able to establish a permanent presence, or a continued presence, then it’s going to be prolonged. But this first segment is going to take a few days,” said the IAEA chief, Rafael Grossi. On Wednesday the Russian-occupying authorities said the team would be given access for one day.

  • The Russian military has “severe manpower shortages” and is seeking to recruit contract service members and may even draw in convicted criminals, a US official has said, citing US intelligence. The official said this may include “compelling wounded soldiers to re-enter combat, acquiring personnel from private security companies, and paying bonuses to conscripts”.

  • Volodymyr Zelenskiy addressed the Venice film festival, describing Russia’s war on Ukraine as “a primitive plot in three acts for the world to make three dramatic mistakes: to get used to the war, to put up with the war, to forget about the war”. Zelenskiy told the audience “not to remain silent” and “not to remain neutral”.

  • Russia has stopped the flow of gas via the Nord Stream 1 pipeline to Europe, citing the need to carry out repairs. The German government rejects the claim, calling it a “pretence”. It said Nord Stream was “fully operational” and that there were no technical issues. The halt on the Baltic Sea pipeline at 5am on Wednesday would last for three days, said Gazprom, the Russian state energy company.

  • Estonia aims to stop most Russians from entering within weeks, its foreign minister, Urmas Reinsalu, has said. “It takes some time, but I think timing is also critical, looking at these vast numbers of Russian citizens entering.”

  • The EU has agreed to suspend a visa travel deal with Moscow. The bloc aims to curb the number of Russian nationals entering for holidays and shopping, but is stopping short of a full tourist visa ban. Meeting in Prague, the EU’s 27 foreign ministers promised to suspend the 2007 visa facilitation agreement with Russia that makes it relatively easy to obtain travel documents.

  • Zelenskiy welcomed the EU visa measure. “I think it is humiliating for Europe when it is considered as just one big boutique or restaurant,” he said. “When the citizens of the state that wants to destroy European values use Europe for their entertainment or shopping, for the vacation of their mistresses while they themselves work for the war or to simply silently wait out the immoral fall of Russia.”

  • The US obtained a warrant to seize a $45m airplane owned by Russian energy firm Lukoil, the US justice department said, though the aircraft is currently believed to be in Russia. The aircraft reportedly flew into and out of Russia in violation of US department of commerce sanctions.

  • G7 finance ministers will discuss the Biden administration’s proposed price cap on Russian oil when they meet on Friday, the White House said. “This is the most effective way, we believe, to hit hard at Putin’s revenue and doing so will result in not only a drop in Putin’s oil revenue, but also global energy prices as well,” said White House spokesperson Karine Jean-Pierre.

A man leaves his damaged apartment building following a Russian missile strike in Kramatorsk, Donetsk region of Ukraine on 31 August.
A man leaves his damaged apartment building following a Russian missile strike in Kramatorsk, Donetsk region of Ukraine on 31 August. Photograph: AFP/Getty Images





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